House #1

Minimum Bid $25

Bee Totem

Nothing says BEES quite like this pollinator house. This Bee Totem calls the bees to make a home right in your garden. The house is a simple design from a pine 4”x4". The 5/16" holes are drilled to the maximum depth. The mason bees lay their eggs individually throughout entire length of the tube. The house should be placed about 4 ft above ground with holes facing eastward. This pollinator house attracts mason bees, which are non-aggressive native bees that pollinate nearly 100 times more than a honey bee.

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Pollinator House Auction

Bee Totem

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House #2
Minimum BID: $40

Bee-ing for the Benefit of Mr. Kite

Designed and Constructed by Matthew Etu
Estimated value $150

The Sgt. Pepper Band is performing for our lonely heart, gentle, solitary bees in Bee-ing for the Benefit of Mr. Kite, a circus themed Bee Hotel featuring the original Victorian poster art of Messrs. Kite and Henderson along with Pablo Fanque on horseback, and John Lennon's original handwriting and artwork from the lyrics!

Summer bees build nesting chambers in small pre-made holes. Each nesting chamber is made of a protective cocoon that the female bee builds out of leaves or petals. The female bee gathers pollen and nectar into a pollen loaf to feed a single egg within each chamber. After she lays an egg, she seals each chamber with more leaves. A female bee will build approximately 10 chambers in each six-inch nesting hole. If the weather is still warm enough, she'll choose another nesting hole and continue pollinating. A female solitary bee such as the leafcutter bee, can lay an egg a day and will continue to do so until her wings become too worn and tattered.

Your summer bees gather pollen differently than honey bees. Unlike honey bees who pack wet pollen into pockets on their hind legs with little falling off, summer bees gather dry pollen and carry it on their hairy abdomens. The dry, loose pollen falls onto each flower they land on and virtually every flower they land on is pollinated!

The box is constructed of ½" exterior plywood, primed, painted, and then decoupaged with paper. The entire box was then coated in a clear, durable topcoat for years of exterior exposure. The Bee House should be placed against a flat surface and located in an area protected from high winds. The front of the house should have a south or southwest exposure where it will get the most sun in winter to keep bees warm. The tubes included are of various sizes to appeal to a variety of native bees. At the end of the season, remove and store cocoon-filled tubes and reeds; these are cocoons for. next year's bees! Spent tubes and reeds should be replaced annually and can be found online.

To attract beneficial bees to your garden, include a variety of plants that bloom from early spring through late fall, choose plants of various heights, including flowering trees and shrubs, and those with a range of flower shapes and sizes, especially wildflowers and native species with blue, purple and yellow flowers. Provide good nesting habitat by preserving a small brush pile, areas with dry grasses and reeds, and dead wood; a muddy area will provide essential nesting material for mason bees. And, above all, avoid using pesticides.

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House #3

Minimum Bid $60

The Purple Martin House

By Arlan Peters

The Purple Martin House was built by adapting a design by Frank Lloyd Wright, which Wright used for decorative finial on the roof of the Martin House in Buffalo.

My building is made up of 107 separate pieces of cedar and reclaimed pine cut from old wood removed when remodeling the third floor of our 1890 house.

Wright’s “Martin Houses” are open on all sides and not actually usable bird houses. I enclosed the sides, making six usable nesting compartments, A dividing wall separates the two units on each floor. The three floors on my version are held together by a threaded metal rod at each corner. If necessary, by prying off the wood caps covering the rods and unscrewing the nuts, the three levels can be unstacked.


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House #4

Minimum Bid: $25

Bee Bricks

By Time Otterson

Want to keep your pollinators entertained? A nice game of Jenga helps while away the time between trips through your garden keeping your plants happy and pollinated.

Inspired by the brutalist design of UB’s Ellicott Complex, this modular housing is made from from 2”x4" cedar. The 5/16" holes are drilled to the maximum depth. The mason bees lay their eggs individually throughout entire length of the tube. The house should be placed about 4 ft above ground with holes facing eastward. This pollinator house attracts mason bees, which are non-aggressive native bees that pollinate nearly 100 times more than a honey bee.

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Bee Bricks

Flower Power

House #5

Minimum Bid $30

Flower Power

By Kristyn Mobb, Rebecca Chilelli, and Camryn Porter

Nothing invigorates a bee more than a little bit of power from a flower. Keep those little pollinators right at home with this Flower inspired home.

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House #6

Minimum Bid $35

Bee Shed

By Adam Kosmowski & Peter Bellanca

Every man needs a Man Cave and a woman her She Shed…don’t forget about your little pollinators. They too need a place to kick back and relax, hiding from the world for a little while. Bring some peace to your bees with their own Bee Shed.

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Butterfly House
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HOuse #8

Minimum bid $30

EKLA Butterfly House

By Amélie Peron & Pauline Oger, France

EKLA is a new pollinator house, designed for butterflies. It aims at protecting the range of Western New York butterflies, while raising awareness about their existence in this place. Our food and our plants depend on them in order to reproduce it, even if this is not well known. Eco-designed with recycled plastic and wooden branches, it is an environmentally friendly product.

BUTTERFLIES

Butterflies need shelters to be protected from bad weather, survive during the lack of flowers and be protected from predators. During the cold season, some species are migrating while some are looking for shelters. The eggs and chrysalids which don't need to be fed are handling better the winter. Butterflies life expectancy is variable, but they all need to go through 4 phases :

1. Egg (between 3 and 8 days)

2. Caterpillar(longest phase)

3. Chrysalid : a complex process. They have diverse shapes and colors.

4. The butterflies start to fly. Their adult life lasts on average 4 weeks.

THE PLACE:

This region hosts more than 1000 lepidopterans : butterflies and night butterflies. Example: the Monarch. A big and orange butterfly. It is migrating for thousands of kilometers each years. They are toxic for most of the predators, as they are eating food that is toxic for them. They are disappearing because of the loss of their habitats, the use of chemical products and the light pollution.

WHAT IS NEEDED?

- Some small wooden promontories promoting the access and heating up of the butterflies with the sun before they leave the nest.

- A trapdoor to drop off some plants.

- Can also be used by lady­birds and night butterflies.

- Has to be close by perfumed plants, in a spot sheltered by a wall, east facing ( to capture more sun).

- A side should be open-able, to control the house at the end of the season and clean it if necessary.


House #9

Minimum Bid $60

Recycled Bird House

By Jim Charlier

I challenged myself to create a garden birdhouse from items found around my house and garden. The absolute most critical design of any birdhouse is entrance hole size. By keeping birdhouse entrance holes to the proper sizes, the houses will be more attractive and birds will be more likely to raise their families safely and securely. Individual birds may use an entrance hole slightly smaller or larger than the size listed. At 1.5” round, this birdhouse has the potential to attract Bluebirds, Carolina wrens, Swallows, Titmouse, Nuthatches, and Hairy Woodpeckers.

Birds are also specific about distance a house is from the ground:

  • Bluebirds, 5-10 feet

  • Carolina Wren, 6-10 feet

  • Swallow, 10-15 feet

  • Hairy Woodpecker, 12-20 feet

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Materials: old fence pickets, antique brass knob set and door knob, terra-cotta pot, old Ikea lamp and electrical wire.


Happy Camper

HOuse # 10

Minimum Bid: $30

The Happy Camper

By Jim Charlier

For birds that enjoy the camping life. The 1’’ hole entrance will attract chickadees and small wrens. Made with scrap lumber and metal flashing.

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House #11

Minimum Bid: $50

The Bat House

By Jim Charlier

The Bat House

Not all bats have bat caves. Most live in trees, under bridges, or in old buildings. A bat house should mimic mimics the space between bark and a tree trunk. Bats like tight spaces. They also need it nice and warm for the babies. That’s why the box is painted a dark color, light netting is stapled to the interior making it more like tree bark and easier for the bats to climb.

Place in an area with lots of sun, at least 15 feet off the ground (to protect against predators); and ideally a water source nearby (so the mother bat doesn’t have to leave her young for too long). Do not mount on a tree, it’s too easy for predators to get them; branches cause obstructions for bats which fly down first, then up, into flight; and it’s too shady from above.

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And surely they’ll be attracted to the bat symbol!


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Entry #12

Minimum Bid: $100

Tin-roofed Bird House

No entrant name

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This quaint bird house full of life and color bears a beautiful tin roof—Cats need not apply!


Entry #13

Minumum Bid: $30

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Bee Hotel

Chris Reed and Peter Ballanca

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Different types of pollinators require different types of homes. They can nest in all types of habitats, from reeds to hollow logs, and underground burrows. My pollinator box is based on function. The Bee Hotel contains approximately 300 bee tubes. The box was constructed using scrap wood, reclaimed screws from kitchen cabinets as well as a piece of reclaimed vent screening. The colors were added to attract the Mason Bees to the structure.